Starfinder Critical Hit Deck

Hello everyone and welcome to d20diaries!

Today we’re taking a look a delightful little pack of cards…. Starfinder Critical Hit Deck!

Starfinder Critical Hit Deck

critical hit deck skittermander taylor fischer
A lucky skittermander! Illustrated by Taylor Fischer. Art courtesy of Paizo Inc.

Starfinder Critical Hit Deck is the size and shape of a deck of playing cards. It retails for around $10.99 USD (or around $15 Canadian dollars). There’s an adorable little skittermander playing with a d20 on the box, with some product information on the back.

The cards inside are high quality and easy to read with a colour scheme matching the Starfinder Core Rulebook. There’s fifty-five cards inside. One contains product information, the open game license, and cites Owen K.C. Stephens as the author and Taylor Fischer as the illustrator. The second card lists the rules of using the Critical Hit Deck. And the other 53 cards are Critical hit Cards.

All of the cards follow a specific set of rules laid out on the rules card. All critical hits deal double damage unless the card specifies otherwise. Any effects listed as ‘Crit Effect’ can replace your weapons regular critical hit effect (if it has one) if you want it to, but you don’t get both. Any effects listed as ‘Bonus Effect’ apply in addition to the critical hit effects of your weapons. There’s some other simple rules for DCs, scaling, and so on, but they’re all easy to get a handle on.

You’ll also need to decide ahead of time how to use the Critical Hit Deck. That is to say, when you use it. For players that’s simple. Every time you score a critical hit (a natural 20 on a d20 dice) you draw a card and apply it’s effects. For GMs it works a little differently. The deck provides three options for the GM to select from. First, the GM draws a card whenever a major villain, creature, or NPC scores a critical hit. Second, drawing a critical hit card is a special ability that NPCs can take, and the GM selects which NPCs have it. And third, the GM draws a card every time a villain, creature, or NPC scores a critical hit. Personally, my family uses it for all PC critical hits and for major villain, creature, and NPC critical hits, but I like that there’s a variety of ways to integrate this deck into your game.

When you score a critical hit you draw a card. Each card has four different critical hit effects. One for energy attacks, one for kinetic attacks, and one for spell attacks. The fourth critical hit effect is an ‘extreme blow’ and lists a single specific damage type (such as electricity or slashing). You simply read the card, select the critical hit effect that matches your damage type, and carry out the effect listed. If you happen to deal the exact same type of damage as the extreme blow you use that critical effect instead. Easy.

Most importantly? It’s fun! My family loves pulling out a card and getting some extra effects. Particularly the extreme blows. It always ends in laughter. Of course, they’re not so thrilled when an enemy does it, but hey, that’s the way the dice land. Haha.

Some of our favourite effects include blast back (energy), lodged in the bone (kinetic), shrapnel by the bone (kinetic), blood magic (spell), vampiric magic (spell), disintegrate (extreme spell), it’s a gusher (extreme melee), mega-smash (extreme bludgeoning), punctured lung (extreme piercing), sound of victory (extreme sonic), severed spine (extreme slashing), and disarmed (literally!)(extreme slashing).

 

Got a favourite critical hit card? Let us know in the comments!

Enjoy!

Jessica

January New Releases

January’s here, which means there’s a whole slew of new d20 products coming out.

Dungeons and Dragons doesn’t have any new releases coming out this month (as far as I know), but last month brought us the Waterdeep: Dungeon of the Mad Mage adventure which brings PCs from levels 5-20, as well as the Guildmasters’ Guide to Ravnica which brings the wonder of Magic: The Gathering to D&D.


Pathfinder released plenty of wonderful products last month, including Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Faiths of GolarionPathfinder Module: Cradle of Night, and Pathfinder Adventure Path 137: The City Outside of Time (Return of the Runelords 5 of 6). None of which I own (sadly) so they’re still on my wish list. Haha. This month Pathfinder fans can expect to see the much anticipated finale of the Return of the Runelords Adventure Path with Pathfinder Adventure Path 138: Rise of New Thassilon. Exciting stuff! There’s also Pathfinder Player Companion: Wilderness Origins  coming out, which is sure to be a solid addition to the Player Companion line. Two new pocket editions are coming out: Ultimate Campaign Pocket Edition and Ultimate Intrigue Pocket Edition. Pathfinder Society Scenarios for this month are #10-12: Breath of the Dragonskull (a Tier 1-5 scenario written by Michael Sayre) and #10-13: Fragments of Antiquity (a Tier 5-9 scenario written by Sam Polak). Finally, Pathfinder Flip-Mat: Tavern Multi-Pack comes out later this month.


Starfinder only has a few releases coming out in January. Starfinder Flip-Mat: Jungle World is a really nice looking map. The Against the Aeon Throne Pawn Collection is finally here, which I’ve been itching to get my hands on! And the Signal of Screams Adventure Path comes to a thrilling conclusion this month with Starfinder Adventure Path 12: Heart of Night (Signal of Screams 3 of 3). Starfinder Society Scenarios for this month are #1-30: Survivor’s Salvation (a Tier 1-4 scenario written by Kiel Howell) and #1-31: Treading History’s Folly (a Tier 3-6 scenario written by Vanessa Hoskins). Last month brought us the Starfinder Critical Hit Deck featuring adorable illustrations of skittermanders, which I’ve yet to get my hands on. If you own it, I’d love to hear what you thought in the comments.


It looks to be an exciting month!

Know of another new d20 product you want to recommend we check out? Let me know in the comments!

Jessica